Aging

Aging at Home

August 13, 2019

Aging at Home

Recent surveys show that nearly 90% of seniors hope to and  plan to live in their current home for as long as they live, now termed “aging in place.” Some have lived in the same house for years or moved into their current home after retirement, to be closer to family, moved to a smaller home that is easier to maintain, or to have access to activities that suit their current lives. In talking to our clients, and our family members, we found that their experience and motivation mirrors what current research says relating to the benefits of staying home, even in cases where some outside assistance is needed for short or long term.  

Benefits of Living at Home

Comfort, independence/control:

When a Senior stays in their residence, they are in a place that is comfortable and familiar to them, with neighbors and friends accessible. They make their own rules, eat what and when they want and watch the TV shows they want. They relish the independence they have, and many dread the thought of someone else setting their schedules. They also feel safer in their own home, both in terms of the physical comfort of getting around a place they know very well, and in having neighbors who can help.  A sense of pride is often mentioned by seniors who retain their independence. Finally, research tells us that those with medical issues recover more quickly and retain their health after recovery when home-based.

Personalized care

If a senior needs assistance, that care is provided one-on-one. That undivided attention for only what is needed versus every resident getting the same treatment is often mentioned as a preference of seniors. Also, the attention is scheduled for when the senior wants the help, not when it is convenient to a caregiver juggling many others.

Affordability

The cost of senior care in nursing homes or assisted living centers can be very high. A recent study showed the average costs of assisted living and nursing homes can range from $50,000 to $100,000 a year. Staying home and having assistance when needed is relatively inexpensive, especially since you only pay for the hours you need. 24-hour care is still possible in the home if needed, but significantly less expensive than paying for a room in a facility.

Human Companionship

Having friends and family accessible is one of the most popular responses as to why seniors prefer staying in their home. Whether they chose to stay in the family home near family and friends, or if they move into a neighborhood heavily populated with seniors, having interaction with others is critical. Personalized caregivers can play a role in the socialization of the senior, but that interaction can be scheduled to fit the senior’s wishes, rather than a center’s schedule.  

Animal Companionship

One issue that many seniors bring up when discussing their living preferences, is their desire to have a loving pet in their home. A dog or cat is the most common pet. For those with dogs, they need to get out and walk the dog which is especially good for the senior, providing not only exercise but the ability to connect with neighbors.  

New Technologies

In today’s technology and delivery based world, there are many new options to help seniors “age in place.” In a recent blog post, we discussed the use of technology to have face-to-face conversations with family and friends. Other technologies that can provide the senior with access to needs:

  • Technology-based ‘emergency alert’ systems, also discussed in a prior blog.
  • Access to voice-activated technologies such as televisions and telephones that run via voice commands.

Fortunately, more and more seniors and their families are finding that home care is possible, especially with the help of companies like ours. Just Like Family Home Care is proud to offer Lee and Collier Counties referrals for sensitive, discreet personal care for our clients to help them better enjoy life at home. Care providers are carefully selected for their compassion, professionalism, and dedication to providing the best care possible.

 

Disclaimer: The blog entry above has been created utilizing different online sources. The blog entry has not been verified by a doctor. Please note that conducting the above-mentioned activities is at the individual’s own risk and responsibility. Please always consult a doctor before exercising or doing any physical activity, especially to avoid injuries or harm due to unknown preconditions. Just Like Family is not responsible for any injuries while conducting the above activities.

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Don’t Talk to me That Way! Improving Communication Skills with Seniors

February 28, 2019

Improving communication skills is good for all of us who are involved with seniors, and for the seniors themselves.   While much as been written about communications skills in general, this particular topic isn’t addressed as often.  Some of the most common statements made by senior citizens about communication issues are:

  • Please don’t yell at me, just talk a little louder and don’t mumble.
  • Please don’t call me Sweetie, Sweetie Pie, Young Lady, Young Man, or any other child-like name.
  • Please don’t say things that make it sound like I am about to die.

Let’s look at the three components above:

  1. The physical act of communication can be a barrier to a good conversation, especially for those with a hearing loss.

Per the Gerontological Society of America’s(GSA) CEO, James Appleby, “two-thirds of adults 70 and over have a hearing loss that affects their daily conversation…. Leading to isolation, depression.”  Hearing loss, however, doesn’t mean yelling is the solution.

In addition to hearing aids, there are strategies to enhance communication with someone with even a slight hearing loss. A Cleveland Clinic guide to improving communications suggests the following:

  • Gain attention: saying the person’s name, or giving a light touch to let the person know you are there.
  • Maintain eye contact: facial expressions and body language are critical pieces of conversations.
  • Avoid covering mouth: Most listeners make use of lip-reading.  Covering your mouth and chewing make that difficult.
  • Speak naturally: shouting is not helpful, nor is mumbling.  Speak distinctly and at a normal rate.  Pausing may help the person process the speech.
  • Avoid background noise: turn off the TV or the radio.

One final note on the physical act of conversation, remember to talk TO the person directly.  A pet peeve of seniors is hearing a visitor ask someone else “how is he or she doing”… as if the person cannot hear.   Another pet phrase that is annoying, “how are WE doing.”  These phrases make the person feel non-existent, versus “how are YOU doing” which makes them feel valued.

  1. The tone of communication can be another barrier to conversation.

Would you like to be addressed in a way that sounds patronizing, or as if you were a small, cute child?  Probably not.  You want to be addressed as an intelligent partner in a conversation.  Seniors want to be treated the same way.  Calling a senior ‘sweetie’ implies you think that person is ‘cute’ which indicates a lack of respect for the person.

Taking this a step further, the GSA has a guide to communicating with older adults, which encourages us to use the same vocabulary we use with other adults.  The report says “as a general rule, older adults maintain their existing vocabulary or continue to improve it.  They have no greater problem understanding complicated words than do members of other age groups, so there is no need to simplify the words you use.”

  1. Finally, let’s discuss the conversation itself. Sometimes we are uncomfortable with talking to seniors, as we don’t think we have much in common.  

Some thoughts to consider:

  • Seniors do not feel their age the way you may think they would. Let’s say you are 40, it is probably safe to say you still feel like you are 25 in your head.  Seniors feel the same.  A 75-year-old probably feels like a 40-year-old inside.  Your conversation can and should be just like when you talk to any adult.  Talk about current events, recent sports stories, etc.   You ask questions, but you also let them know about you.
  • Seniors do not approach each day as one more day before they die, it’s just today. Don’t ask questions or talk so it sounds like you are writing their obituary or ‘taking stock’ of their life.  As an example, “what do you wish you had done by now and haven’t” might be a good employment interview question, but to a senior, it can sound like you are trying to assess their lifetime value.

So, what are good conversation starters?  Here are some ideas.

  • What is your favorite food, and has that always been your favorite?
  • Do you have a favorite holiday? Why that one?
  • Do you like to read? What type of reading (books, magazines)?  Prefer printed materials, online, or audio?
  • How did you meet your wife/husband?
  • Have you traveled much? Where?
  • Have you always lived in this location? Where else?
  • When you were a child, what did you do for fun? Any sports?
  • Do you have a favorite movie? TV show?  From now, or earlier.
  • Did you work, and if so, what was your favorite job?
  • What technology do you like? Or what do you wish was never invented?
  • Do you have a favorite College/University? Did you attend there?
  • I am struggling to decide XXX, have you experienced that?
  • Do you have any hobbies, or some you used to have, or some you would like to start?

 

 

 

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Is it memory loss, Dementia or Alzheimer’s?

December 26, 2018

As we age, most of us will feel that we have become more forgetful.  The term “senior moment” has even become a common phrase to express how that feels when we forget why we went into a room, a friend’s name, or where the keys are.  For most of us, these events are normal. It is also normal to feel that one’s memory is declining after age 65.  That decline is annoying but normal, and strategies to improve memory are available.  Our December 4, 2018 blog shared some popular ones.  However, if you or your loved one seems to have a feeling that memory is declining, medical providers should be alerted.

The National Institute on Aging (NIA) defines dementia as “the loss of cognitive functioning—thinking, remembering, and reasoning—and behavioral abilities to such an extent that it interferes with a person’s daily life and activities.”  At its most severe stage, the person depends “completely on others for basic activities of daily living.”  Many different diseases can cause dementia, and drugs are available to treat some of these diseases.

Alzheimer’s Disease is the most common cause of dementia, accounting for 60-80% of dementia cases.  Alzheimer’s Disease is a progressive disease with symptoms worsening over the years.  The Alzheimer’s Association provides an early detection list of 10 warning signs, along with changes that are normal changes as we age at this site:  https://www.alz.org/media/Documents/10-signs-checklist.pdf, but is summarized below.

The signs include:

  1. Memory loss that disrupts daily life (vs. forgetting names and appointments)
  2. Challenges in planning or solving problems (vs. occasional errors when balancing a checkbook.)
  3. Difficulty completing familiar (daily) tasks (vs. needing help to use the microwave.)
  4. Confusion with time or place (vs. confused about the day of the week, but figuring it out later.)
  5. Trouble understanding visual images and spatial relationship (vs. vision changes due to cataracts.)
  6. New problems with words in speaking or writing (vs. having trouble finding the right word.)
  7. Misplacing things and losing the ability to retrace steps (vs. misplacing things from time to time and retracing steps to find them.)
  8. Decreased or poor judgment (vs. making a bad decision once in a while.)
  9. Withdrawal from work or social activities (vs. feeling weary of work, family or social obligations.
  10. Changes in mood and personality (vs. developing specific ways of doing things and becoming irritable when a routine in disrupted.)

Just Like Family is a home health care provider in Naples always focused on the well-being of clients, trying to help them stay independent in their own home.

Disclaimer: The blog entry above has been created utilizing different online sources. The blog entry has not been verified by a doctor. Please note that conducting the above-mentioned activities is at the individual’s own risk and responsibility. Please always consult a doctor before exercising or doing any physical activity, especially to avoid injuries or harm due to unknown preconditions. Just Like Family is not responsible for any injuries while conducting the above activities.

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